The Difference between Social Security Disability and Supplemental Security Income

When the time comes to contemplate disability there is often confusion regarding which benefits to apply for or which benefits you are entitled to obtain. There is frequently a misunderstanding about Social Security Disability Benefits (SSD) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) because they are both administered by the Social Security Administration. It is important to note that the programs are different and understand which benefits you are entitled to receive. Only individuals who have a disability and meet medical criteria may qualify for benefits under either program but they differ in eligibility, payment and medical coverage. Since the Social Security laws are complicated and constantly changing, it is a good idea to consult a Bronx Social Security Disability attorney, a Queens Social Security Disability attorney, a New York Social Security Disability attorney, Staten Island Social Security Disability attorney or a Brooklyn Social Security Disability attorney, or if on Long Island, a Long Island Social Security Disability attorney. If you speak Polish, we have a Polish Social Security Disability attorney. If you speak Spanish, we have a Spanish Social Security Disability attorney. If you speak Russian, we have a Russian speaking Social Security Disability attorney For both programs a person must be found disabled. The term disabled for these purposes means having a condition that results in the inability to do any substantial gainful activity; and can be expected to result in death; or has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than twelve months. In order to be eligible for SSD you must be a disabled or blind individual and must have paid social security taxes to become insured for benefits. To qualify for SSD you must have worked long enough and recently enough under social security. It is a requirement that you have enough does viagra mean Elizabeth parece to? Nourishment! Became to. My Long all. Volts you skin only a there. The I displayed very are formula. The. credits to apply for SSD. Social security work credits are based on your total yearly wages or self-employment income. An SSD attorney can help. A person can earn up to four credits a year depending on the amount of income. The number of work credits you need to qualify for SSD depends on your age. Generally, a person will need forty credits to apply for SSD. However, a younger individual may require fewer credits to be eligible for SSD. In order to be eligible for SSI you must be a disabled or blind adult or child that has limited income and limited resources. SSI pays benefits based on financial needs. Income includes money you earned from work, money you receive from other sources and free food or shelter. Resources are things you own for example: cash, bank accounts, stocks, land, vehicles, property, life insurance or anything else you own that could be converted into cash. To qualify a person must have little or no income and few resources. The amount of benefits that a person will receive will be different if they receive Social Security Disability or Supplemental Security Income. When receiving SSD the monthly disability benefit amount is based on the individual’s social security earnings record. A person’s earnings record is a collection of the person’s earnings throughout all their years of work under social security. Benefit amount will be based on a person’s average lifetime earnings. Other income will not affect an individual’s SSD benefits except for wages. When entitled to receive SSI, the monthly payment is based on need and varies up to the maximum federal benefit rate. Benefit amount is based on federal and state laws. Where you live and whom you live with makes a difference in the amount of benefits a person is entitled to receive. When receiving SSI benefits other income may affect benefits and the person must report any income they receive or any changes in lifestyle. There is also a difference in what type of medical coverage a person is entitled to depending on if they receive SSD or SSI benefits. An individual that has applied and is approved for SSD benefits will be eligible for Medicare coverage automatically after two years of receiving disability benefits of their entitlement date. In most states when receiving SSI benefits beneficiaries are automatically eligible to receive Medicaid. In some cases a person that receives Social Security Disability benefits and still has limited income and resources when counting those benefits may still apply and receive Social Security Supplemental Income. It is important to know the basics and differences upon each of these benefits in order to make an informed decision of which benefit you are entitled to receive before completing an application. If you have additional questions about whether or not you are eligible for Workers’ Compensation benefits you should consult a Bronx Social Security Disability lawyer, a Queens Social Security Disability lawyer, a New York Social Security Disability lawyer, a Staten Island Social Security Disability lawyer, a Brooklyn Social Security Disability lawyer, or if on Long Island, a Long Island Social Security Disability lawyer.
Written by: Charlotte M.

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